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A State Of Confusion | What Exactly Is ‘Healthy’ Eating?

In today’s ever-changing world of fitness,  knowing exactly what counts as a ‘healthy’ diet can be a bit of a head scratcher. One minute, carbs are our enemy, the next, super foods and Sauerkraut are on the menu. And don’t even get us started on the myriad of celebrity-inspired diet trends that seem to pop up as soon as the sun starts to shine!

Just when we think we’ve got our nutrition nailed, up crops yet another foodie fad that throws everything we thought we knew out of the window. It’s no surprise that there is an increase in obsessive eating. Guided by the gurus of social media, we’re cutting out major food groups in a quest to join the ‘clean eating’ club.

The 2017 Food & Health Survey found that consumers rely on nutrition information they don’t trust and 80% of those surveyed reported feeling confused about what they were supposed to eat, and what to ditch. The term ‘healthy’ has taken on new meanings, to include restrictive fad diets, fasting and calorie tracking. Though it’s not a case of just how many calories, or meals you have each day… it’s where those calories are coming from.

It often takes the guidance of an expert to explain exactly what constitutes a ‘healthy’ diet. And by experts, we’re talking about GPs, health professionals and qualified personal trainers… not YouTube stars and fitness bloggers who often have no reputable qualifications!

The study showed that while respondents view nutritionists and healthcare professionals as the most trusted sources for diet advice, friends and family are still more likely to be the ones they go to for guidance. Probably seeing as it’s easier to text a friend than it is to pay for a nutrition consultation. So it’s easy to see how bad advice can make it’s way very quickly around the social grapevine!

This is where qualified fitness and nutrition professionals can make a difference, especially for those that need reliable, safe and effective guidance in order to improve their fitness performance. Whether it’s a question of what to eat before running a marathon, or the best way to prepare for the gruelling Tough Mudder, the advice of an expert is essential to success.

As a qualified Personal Trainer, it’s a great time to specialise in nutrition for sports and exercise performance, as lifestyles become healthier and the nation is more focused on fitness.

Introducing Our New Active IQ Level 3 Award in Nutrition for Sport and Exercise Performance

If this gets your appetite for ambition going, the first thing you’ll need is a competency qualification, such as a Level 2 Gym Instructor certificate. You’ll also need to hold either a Level 3 Personal Trainer, Level 3 Diploma in Exercise Referral or Level 3 Nutrition for Physical Activity qualification. Don’t worry if you don’t already have these…  we can bolt them onto your course package for you.

The course covers:

  • The benefits of a healthy, balanced diet to optimise sports performance
  • How to access credible information about sports and performance nutrition
  • The benefits and risks of specific nutritional protocols that may be used to prepare for sports or fitness events
  • The current scientific evidence relating to the safety and efficacy of common, legally available supplements and Ergogenic aids.
  • Knowledge of meal timing, supplementation, Carb loading, post activity glycogen replenishment, and much more.

This course is delivered purely by distance learning. Once you’ve enrolled, your dedicated support tutor will give you a call to talk you through the online learning portal, course content and assessment guidelines. You’ll agree and set realistic dates for the submission of your online coursework and you can call or e-mail your tutor for support, as and when required.

The course takes a minimum of 4 weeks, although most learners complete it within 4-8 weeks.

Ready? So are we. Get in touch with the team for more details!


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